Bess Levin is the best! Please check out the Viking Global latest investor letter at DealBreaker.com. Combining the letter with our 13F filing data, you will get a better picture of Viking’s investment strategy.

Fundville Analytics Team

Julian Robertson’s Tigers, under the “rigorous” training of Wall Street with fear and greed, have lost wildness and become typical civilized Americans. They love “Apple” (AAPL), like to “Google” (GOOG), drink “Pepsi” (PEP) all the time, eat “Monsanto” (MON) gene modified pop corns, watch TV from “DirecTV” (DTV) and enjoy shopping with credit cards from “Visa” (V) and “MasterCard” (MA). They all live in big houses (IYR) and bank at the Chase (JPM). Once in a while, they bid expensive stuff from EBay (EBAY). Well, that’s basically the 10 most popular stocks held by 38 Tiger Club members, all are acclaimed successful hedge fund managers.

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Absolute Return+Alpha (AR) published its year 2009 “Rich List” last week. Many of these high-paid managers were highlighted on our site and blogs before. Based on AR’s list, we added links to each fund’s portfolio holdings and also Fund IDs. Fund ID is a unique number in our internal database that identifies each fund. Users can build out a “clone” portfolio following these managers with our tools “Masters” and “VPStock“. Read blogs on how to use Masters” and “VPStock tools before you give them a try.

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Julian Robertson at U. of Virginia

Julian Robertson at U. of Virginia

From Wikipedia:

Julian H. Robertson Jr., KNZM (Hon) (born 1932) is an American former hedge fund manager. Now retired, Robertson invests directly in other hedge funds, most run by former employees of Robertson’s defunct hedge fund company.

He was born in Salisbury, North Carolina in the United States. Robertson founded the investment firm Tiger Management Corp., one of the earliest hedge funds. Robertson is credited with turning $8 million in start-up capital in 1980 into over $22 billion in the late 1990s, though that was followed by a fast downward spiral of investor withdrawals that ended with the fund closing in 2000.

In 1993, his compensation and share of Tiger’s gain exceeded $300 million. His 2003 estimated net worth was over $400 million, and in September 2009 it was estimated by Forbes at $2.2 billion, a substantial increase from the $1.3 billion estimated the previous year. Robertson said in 2008 that he shorted subprime securities and made money through credit default swaps.The following year, according to Forbes, Robertson’s return on his $200-million personal trading account was 150 percent.

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